VIETNAM - LONG, GEORGE FRANCIS

Long, George Francis

VIETNAM - LONG, GEORGE FRANCIS
LONG, GEORGE FRANCIS

Rank: Private First Class

Unit: B Troop, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment

MOS: 11B – Infantryman

Awards: Bronze Star Medal with Valor Device, Purple Heart Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

Badges: Combat Infantryman Badge

Unit awards: Presidential Unit Citation, Valorous Unit Award, Vietnamese Gallantry Cross with Palm device

Enlisted by: Selected Service

Date of birth: 31-Dec-1943

Hometown: Tuckahoe, New Jersey

Marital status: Married to Patricia Long

Campaign: Vietnam Conflict

Entered service: 16-Nov-1966

Start of tour: 21-Jan-1968

Incident date: 30-May-1968

Date of casualty: 30-May-1968

Age at death: 24

Cause of death: Hostile, died. Grenade. Multiple fragmentation wounds.
George Francis Long died from wound received while in combat operation when engaged hostile force in firefight.

Five Blackhorse troopers died in this incident:
SP4 Gerald Alan Collis
SP4 James Davis
SGT Joseph Harold Graham
PFC George Francis Long
SGT John David Pape

Location of fatality: Hua Nghia, South Vietnam

Place of interment: Calvary Baptist Church Cemetery, Ocean View, New Jersey, USA

View this soldier‘s Find a Grave page (opens in a new window)

Vietnam Veterans Memorial panel and row: 63W 018 (view Vietnam Veterans Memorial link in a new window)

 

BRONZE STAR MEDAL

BRONZE STAR MEDAL
WITH VALOR DEVICE
POSTHUMOUS

PRIVATE FIRST CLASS GEORGE FRANCIS LONG
30 MAY 1968
B TROOP, 1st SQUADRON
11TH ARMORED CAVALRY REGIMENT

Private First Class Long distinguished himself by valorous actions on 30 May 1968, while serving as a Scout Observer with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, on a reconnaissance in force mission northwest of Saigon, Vietnam. The armored column was suddenly engaged by a well concealed enemy force along the roadway. Completely disregarding his own safety, Private Long courageously remained in a highly exposed position and professionally provided the machine gunners of his vehicle with ammunition. While performing this vital function, Private Long was struck and mortally wounded by enemy fire. Private First Class Long’s personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division General Orders No. 5115 (24 June 1968)