VIETNAM - MULLINS, DANIEL LEE

Mullins, Daniel Lee

VIETNAM - MULLINS, DANIEL LEE
MULLINS, DANIEL LEE

Rank: First Lieutenant

Unit: K Troop, 3rd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment

MOS: 1204 – Armored Reconnaissance Unit Commander

Awards: Bronze Star Medal with Valor Device and Oak Leaf Cluster, Purple Heart Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

Unit awards: Valorous Unit Award, Meritorious Unit Citation, Vietnamese Gallantry Cross with Palm device

Enlisted by: Regular

Date of birth: 21-Oct-1943

Hometown: Pound, Virginia

Marital status: Never Married

Campaign: Vietnam Conflict

Entered service: 26-Aug-1966

Start of tour: 2-May-1967

Incident date: 30-Aug-1967

Date of casualty: 31-Aug-1967

Age at death: 23

Cause of death: Hostile, died of wounds. Explosive Device. Other explosive device.
Daniel Lee Mullins died as result of metal fragment wounds received while in base camp standing beside road when military vehicle traveling on road struck a hostile mine.

Location of fatality: Long Khanh, South Vietnam

Place of interment: Powell Valley Memorial Gardens, Big Stone Gap, Virginia, USA

View this soldier‘s Find a Grave page (opens in a new window)

Vietnam Veterans Memorial panel and row: 25E 075 (view Vietnam Veterans Memorial link in a new window)

 

BRONZE STAR MEDAL

BRONZE STAR MEDAL
WITH VALOR DEVICE
POSTHUMOUS

SECOND LIEUTENANT DANIEL LEE MULLINS, ARMOR
21 JULY 1967
K TROOP, 3rd SQUADRON

11TH ARMORED CAVALRY REGIMENT

Second Lieutenant Mullins distinguished himself by valorous actions on 21 July 1967, while serving as a platoon leader of an Armored Assault Vehicle convoy traveling in the vicinity of Ap Binh Hoa, Vietnam. Without warning, an estimated reinforced Viet Gong battalion attacked with rockets, recoilless rifles, automatic weapons, and small arms, firing from both sides of the road. As Lieutenant Mullins entered the main concentration of fire, he fearlessly dismounted and directed his men into perimeter positions. Monitoring a call from forward elements under withering fire, Lieutenant Mullins remounted his vehicle and sped to the aid of the beleaguered fellow soldiers. At that moment, an anti-tank round penetrated his Armored Cavalry Assault Vehicle, hurling him a considerable distance. Disregarding both his own safety and the agonizing pain of his wounds, Lieutenant Mullins returned to his vehicle and continued to direct the fire of his men with great accuracy upon the aggressors. When the intensity of the fight had subsided, Lieutenant Mullins aggressively drove the length of the convoy in order to replenish ammunition for his men. Notified that two of his superiors were wounded and evacuated, he then led in a sweep of the battle area, Second Lieutenant Mullins’ courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division General Orders No. 4650 (13 September 1967)

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