VIETNAM - WETZLER, ROBIN KIRMEYER

Wetzler, Robin Kirmeyer

VIETNAM - WETZLER, ROBIN KIRMEYER
WETZLER, ROBIN KIRMEYER

Rank: First Lieutenant

Unit: Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment

MOS: 1981 – Air Observation Pilot

Awards: Distinguished Flying Cross with Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart Medal, Air Medal with 13 Oak Leaf Clusters, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

Badges: Army Aviator Badge

Unit awards: Vietnamese Gallantry Cross with Palm device

Note: AH-1G, Tail # 67-15638, Pilot
Flight class: 68-516/68-28, Fort Wolters, Texas

Enlisted by: Reserve

Commission Source: Armor OCS Class 32-67 B1, Fort Knox, Kentucky

Date of birth: 19-Sep-1946

Hometown: Ogden, Utah

Marital status: Never Married

Campaign: Vietnam Conflict

Entered service: 11-Jan-1967

Start of tour: 1-Mar-1969

Incident date: 10-Jul-1969

Date of casualty: 10-Jul-1969

Age at death: 22

Cause of death: Non-hostile, died of other causes. Helicopter Crash — Crew (MC). Aircraft loss, crash not at sea.
Robin Kirmeyer Wetzler died while pilot of a military aircraft on a military mission when the aircraft crashed and burned. / Pilot of AH-1G aircraft returning from fire support mission.  Aircraft crashed and burned for unknown reasons. / Summary: Crashed 2 KM East-Southeast of Quan Loi Air Field due to bad weather.

Two Blackhorse troopers died in this incident:
1LT Thomas Allen Ceres
1LT Robin Kirmeyer Wetzler

Location of fatality: Binh Long, South Vietnam, XT 830 899

Place of interment: Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, USA

View this soldier‘s Find a Grave page (opens in a new window)

Vietnam Veterans Memorial panel and row: 21W 096 (view Vietnam Veterans Memorial link in a new window)

 

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS
WITH OAK LEAF CLUSTER
POSTHUMOUS

FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBIN KIRMEYER WETZLER, ARMOR
10 JULY 1969
AIR CAVALRY TROOP
11TH ARMORED CAVALRY REGIMENT

First Lieutenant Wetzler, United States Army, for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary action above and beyond the call of duty on 10 July 1969 while serving as flight commander of the Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date Lieutenant Wetzler flew in support of elements of the 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, with another ship. Despite the intensive hostile fire and extremely poor flying conditions, he made repeated low passes, returning effective suppressive fire into the enemy positions until his ammunition had been expended. L Knowing that the accompanying winged ship’s pilot lacked experience he continued to direct fire by making precariously low passes showing the other aircraft what was to be done. He maintained this posture until the other ship’s ammunition had also been expended. While leading the airplane through the thick fog back to their home base, Lieutenant Wetzler crashed and was killed. First Lieutenant Wetzler’s concern for the welfare of his fellow comrades and complete disregard for his safety were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 2985 (22 October 1969), Amended by GO 3711 (2 November 1969)

 

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS
POSTHUMOUS

FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBIN KIRMEYER WETZLER, ARMOR
11 MAY 1969
AIR CAVALRY TROOP
11TH ARMORED CAVALRY REGIMENT

First Lieutenant Wetzler distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary action above and beyond the all of duty on 11 May 1969 while serving as commander of a helicopter gunship with the Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date while he was flying in support of one of the regiment’s units, the friendly troops came under heavy automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fire from a large enemy force. After pinpointing the hostile positions, Lieutenant Wetzler began making low level assaults to deliver accurate mini-gun and rocket fire. Each time he broke from his strafing runs, the enemy directed intense automatic weapons fire toward his aircraft. Nevertheless, he continued to place devastating fire on the hostile emplacements until the enemy had broken contact and he had expended 350 aerial rockets and over 21,000 rounds of mini-gun ammunition. First Lieutenant Wetzler’s outstanding courage and determination were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 2067 (18 August 18 1969)

 

 

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